Checklist

South African National Survey of Arachnida: A checklist of the spiders (Arachnida, Araneae) of the Tswalu Kalahari Reserve in the Northern Cape province, South Africa

Anna S. Dippenaar-Schoeman, Charles R. Haddad, Robin Lyle, Leon N. Lotz, Stefan H. Foord, Rudy Jocque, Peter Webb
Koedoe | Vol 60, No 1 | a1486 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/koedoe.v60i1.1486 | © 2018 Anna S. Dippenaar-Schoeman, Charles R. Haddad, Robin Lyle, Leon N. Lotz, Stefan H. Foord, Rudy Jocque, Peter Webb | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 08 August 2017 | Published: 09 July 2018

About the author(s)

Anna S. Dippenaar-Schoeman, Biosystematics Arachnology, ARC – Plant Protection Research Institute; Department of Zoology, University of Venda, South Africa
Charles R. Haddad, Department of Zoology & Entomology, University of the Free State, South Africa
Robin Lyle, Biosystematics Arachnology, ARC – Plant Protection Research Institute, South Africa
Leon N. Lotz, Department of Arachnology, National Museum Bloemfontein, South Africa
Stefan H. Foord, Department of Zoology, University of Venda, South Africa
Rudy Jocque, Royal Museum for Central Africa, Tervuren, Belgium
Peter Webb, South African National Survey of Arachnida, Pretoria, South Africa


Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

One of the aims of South African National Survey of Arachnida (SANSA) is to survey protected areas to obtain species-specific information and compile inventories to determine species distribution patterns and evaluate their conservation status for Red Data assessments. The aim of this study, the first in a series of surveys of the Diamond Route Reserves, was to compile the first checklist of the spider species in the Northern Cape at the Tswalu Kalahari Reserve. Spiders were collected during three survey periods (2005−2013) using different collecting methods to sample both the ground and field layers. In total, 32 families represented by 108 genera and 136 species have been collected so far. The most species-rich families are the Salticidae (20 spp.) and Thomisidae (18 spp.), followed by the Gnaphosidae and Araneidae (11 spp. each), while nine families are represented by singletons. The free-living wandering spiders represent 97 spp., while 39 spp. are web-builders. Information on spider guilds, endemicity value and conservation status are provided. The Tswalu Kalahari Reserve protects approximately 6.1% of the total South African spider fauna, while 24.3% of the species found in the reserve are South African endemics, of which 5.9% are Northern Cape endemics. Approximately 6.0% of the species sampled are possibly new to science or represent new records for South Africa.

Conservation implications: The Tswalu Kalahari Reserve falls within the Savanna Biome in the Northern Cape province. Only one spider species was previously known from the reserve; a further 135 spp. are reported for the first time, with 5.9% of the species being Northern Cape endemics and 24.3% South African endemics. Approximately 6.0% of the species may be new to science or represent new records for South Africa.

Keywords

Guilds; Conservation; Biodiversity; Northern Cape

Metrics

Total abstract views: 193
Total article views: 197


Crossref Citations

No related citations found.