Short Communication

Protecting and preserving South African aeolianite surfaces from graffiti

Charles W. Helm, Hayley C. Cawthra, Richard M. Cowling, Jan C. De Vynck, Martin G. Lockley, Curtis W. Marean, Mark G. Dixon, Carina J.Z. Helm, Willo Stear, Guy H.H. Thesen, Jan A. Venter
Koedoe | Vol 63, No 1 | a1656 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/koedoe.v63i1.1656 | © 2021 Charles W Helm, Hayley C Cawthra, Richard M Cowling, Jan C De Vynck, Martin G Lockley, Curtis W Marean, Mark G Dixon, Carina J Z Helm, Willo Stear, Guy H H Thesen, Jan A Venter | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 17 September 2020 | Published: 11 March 2021

About the author(s)

Charles W. Helm, African Centre for Coastal Palaeoscience, Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa
Hayley C. Cawthra, African Centre for Coastal Palaeoscience, Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa
Richard M. Cowling, African Centre for Coastal Palaeoscience, Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa
Jan C. De Vynck, African Centre for Coastal Palaeoscience, Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa
Martin G. Lockley, African Centre for Coastal Palaeoscience, Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa
Curtis W. Marean, African Centre for Coastal Palaeoscience, Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa
Mark G. Dixon, African Centre for Coastal Palaeoscience, Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa
Carina J.Z. Helm, African Centre for Coastal Palaeoscience, Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa
Willo Stear, African Centre for Coastal Palaeoscience, Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa
Guy H.H. Thesen, African Centre for Coastal Palaeoscience, Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa
Jan A. Venter, African Centre for Coastal Palaeoscience, Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa


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Abstract

Pleistocene aeolianite surfaces on the South African coastline, which occur in national parks, other protected areas, as well as unprotected areas, are of profound scientific, cultural, palaeoenvironmental and heritage importance. A threat is posed to these surfaces by the increasing presence of graffiti, which may deface or destroy fossil tracksites and other evidence of events that transpired on these surfaces when they were composed of unconsolidated sand tens of thousands of years ago. Increased awareness of the importance of this heritage resource is desirable, along with the development of strategies to prevent further damage.

Keywords

protected areas; management; Pleistocene; conservation; graffiti

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