Original Research

Bio-accumulation of selected metals in African sharptooth catfish Clarias gariepinus from the lower Olifants River, Mpumalanga, South Africa

H.H. Du Preez, M. van der Merwe, J.H.J. van Vuren
Koedoe | Vol 40, No 1 | a265 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/koedoe.v40i1.265 | © 1997 H.H. Du Preez, M. van der Merwe, J.H.J. van Vuren | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 01 August 1997 | Published: 01 August 1997

About the author(s)

H.H. Du Preez, Rand Afrikaans University, South Africa
M. van der Merwe, Rand Afrikaans University, South Africa
J.H.J. van Vuren, Rand Afrikaans University, South Africa

Full Text:

PDF (5MB)

Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

The level of metal (Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) bio- accumulation in tissues (muscle, gill, kidney, liver and gonads) and bile of the African catfish Clarias gariepinus, from the lower Olifants River was investigated. These metals were detected in all the tissues as well as in the bile, with the highest concentration found in either the gills, liver or gonadal tissue. The lowest concentration was usually detected in the muscle tissue. Although statistic comparisons revealed no significant differences between the localities, fish from the Selati River (Locality 1) generally had higher metal levels than fish from the localities along the Olifants River inside the Kruger National Park. The higher levels in the fish from the Selati River may be attributed to anthropogenic activities resulting in point and/or diffuse sources of metal pollution. These sources should be identified and reduced.

Keywords

fish, metals, bio-accumulation, river.

Metrics

Total abstract views: 3389
Total article views: 2678

 

Crossref Citations

1. Metal concentrations in Hydrocynus vittatus (Castelnau 1861) populations from a premier conservation area: Relationships with environmental concentrations
Ruan Gerber, Nico J. Smit, Johan H.J. van Vuren, Victor Wepener
Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety  vol: 129  first page: 91  year: 2016  
doi: 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2016.03.009